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In the News

The American Heartworm Society is the leading resource on heartworm disease, and our mission is to lead the veterinary profession and the public in the understanding of this serious disease. Every year, hundreds of stories are written on the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of heartworm, as well as on the plight of affected pets. These stories are an important way of reaching both veterinary professionals and pet owners with information they need to know about heartworm disease.

The American Heartworm Society is led by a board of directors comprised of veterinarians and specialists in the fields of veterinary parasitology and internalmedicine. As leaders in the fight against heartworm disease, they are available as resources and authors of related stories.

Members of the media are encouraged to contact the American Heartworm Society for information, visuals and interviews about heartworm disease. Please contact Sue O’Brien at [email protected] or call 319-231-6129. All other inquiries, please email: [email protected]

 


 

News & Alerts

Buy the dozen

Persuading clients to purchase a 12-month supply of preventives gets easier if you explain the benefits well and price your products competitively.

WRITTEN BY  IN AUGUST 2019

Do you get frustrated when trying to convince clients that flea, tick and heartworm prevention is not just a seasonal issue? We know that pet owners need to give preventives year-round to maintain efficacy and ensure pet health. But clients still walk out the door without purchasing products. Or they buy one to six doses and neglect to come back when they run out.

All About Pets: Hot, rainy weather just right for heartworms

The recent rains and storms can give rise to a big surge in the mosquito population that could result in a big threat to our pets: heartworm infection. Heartworms are the common name of Dirofilaria immitis, 12-inch long worms that dwell inside the heart chambers and lungs of affected animals. Although the disease is most prevalent in the hot southeastern parts of the U.S., there have been cases all the way north of the Great Lakes. An incidence map denoting the areas where this infection is most prevalent can be seen at https://www.heartwormsociety.org/veterinary-resources/incidence-maps. Unsurprisingly, Florida is heartworm heaven and there’s a widespread infection that includes not just dogs as victims but cats, foxes, coyotes, ferrets, and other mammals.

Get a handle on heartworm disease

Having a solid understanding of the heartworm life cycle—and the damage this disease can do—is the first step in getting pet owners on the right track with treatment.

Heartworm hotspots: When pet travel is the trouble

Heartworm disease is affecting more dogs and cats in more parts of the country than ever, in part due to the long-distance transport of shelter animals. Here’s what you need to know to educate your veterinary clients.

Ask the Vet Heartworms a Year-Round Danger

By Dr. Ken McMillan
DTN Contributing Editor

QUESTION:

I give my dog heartworm preventive every month, but my vet told me he's seen cases where consistently-treated dogs still develop heartworms. How is this possible? I've been told we are to use this preventive every month of the year, but I wonder if that can actually cause resistance in these worms? Using antibiotics too often can create resistant bacteria, so why doesn't heartworm preventive do the same thing? Please explain the difference.

Heartworm Positive Dogs Crowd Shelters Awaiting Potential Adopters

SAN MARCOS, Texas -- While mosquito bites may be a nuisance to us, one bite could potentially be a death sentence for dogs if they become infected with heartworms and go untreated.

  • More dogs get heartworms in spring, summer
  • Higher abundance of mosquitoes
  • Treatment costs a lot of money

The spring and summer months in Texas bring a higher intake of heartworm-positive dogs to area shelters due to the amount of mosquitoes transmitting the disease.

More dogs are getting sick as climate change pushes diseases into new parts of the US

SAN FRANCISCO – As if this year's stormsfloods and heat waves weren't enough to worry you, some experts fear climate change is also expanding the distribution of diseases that can sicken or even kill dogs, putting more pets at risk for diseases their owners have never had to deal with before.

Heartworm is a horrific pet disease in Doña Ana County, but preventable

Southern New Mexico is facing more insecticide-resistant mosquitoes, and epidemiologist Michael Landen with the state Department of Health recently warned, "with climate change, New Mexico will increasingly be seeing mosquito-borne disease."

3 Super-Simple Heartworm Prevention Tips

Heartworm is a nasty, potentially fatal disease caused by parasitic worms living in an animal’s heart and blood vessels. It’s a bad deal. Fortunately, Banfield Pet Hospital’s 2016 State of Pet Health Report found a 33.1 percent decline in the number of confirmed heartworm cases in their hospitals between 2011 and 2016. Woo! This trend has a lot to do with proactive prevention on the part of pet owners. Here are three simple things you can do to protect your dog from this horrible disease.  

Can Your Zip Code Make Your Dog More Susceptible to Heartworm?

All 50 states have had confirmed cases of heartworm since the disease’s discovery back in 1856. However, since mosquitoes are responsible for transferring the parasite from dog to dog, some areas do pose a higher risk than others.

According to the American Heartworm Society, Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, Texas and Tennessee are the top five worst states when it comes to heartworm diagnosis, in that order. In fact, in a 2016 AHS Incidence Survey, 10 percent of canines in Mississippi tested positive for the parasite. That’s…a lot.

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Latest News

Twitter: @AHS_Think12

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