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In the News

The American Heartworm Society is the leading resource on heartworm disease, and our mission is to lead the veterinary profession and the public in the understanding of this serious disease. Every year, hundreds of stories are written on the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of heartworm, as well as on the plight of affected pets. These stories are an important way of reaching both veterinary professionals and pet owners with information they need to know about heartworm disease.

The American Heartworm Society is led by a board of directors comprised of veterinarians and specialists in the fields of veterinary parasitology and internalmedicine. As leaders in the fight against heartworm disease, they are available as resources and authors of related stories.

Members of the media are encouraged to contact the American Heartworm Society for information, visuals and interviews about heartworm disease. Please contact Sue O’Brien at [email protected] or call 319-231-6129. All other inquiries, please email: [email protected]

 


 

News & Alerts

Heartworm: A deadly, but preventable, disease in pets

BOARDMAN, Ohio (WKBN) -- Mahoning County animal activists are warning about the dangers of heartworm in pets. A dog named Marnie had to be euthanized on Saturday after she was diagnosed with a severe case of heartworm.

According to the American Heartworm Society, the disease is characterized by footlong worms that live in the infected animal's heart, lungs and other blood vessels. It's a blood-borne disease that causes lung disease, heart failure and damage to other organs. The disease can be spread by mosquitos.

AHS Announces 16th Triennial Heartworm Symposium Program

Wilmington, Delaware—From heartworm prevalence and resistance to the potential for new diagnostic, preventive and treatment options, attendees of the 16th Triennial Heartworm Symposium in New Orleans will gain insights into heartworm disease management, both today and in the future. The symposium, entitled Understanding Heartworm Disease: From Science to Solutions, will be held September 8-11, 2019, at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in New Orleans. The meeting is sponsored by the American Heartworm Society (AHS).

2018 Canine Heartworm Guidelines Offer New Recommendations

In recognition of National Heartworm Awareness Month in April, the Texas Veterinary Medical Association (TVMA) is highlighting the latest protocols for heartworm management in The American Heartworm Society's (AHS) recently released 2018 Canine Heartworm Guidelines and encouraging pet owners to start the conversation with their veterinarians about heartworm prevention.

 

 

New Orleans to host fall heartworm symposium

Registration is underway for the triennial meeting of the American Heartworm Society.

Registration has opened for the 16th Triennial Heartworm Symposium, a meeting that aims to teach veterinary professionals just about everything they should know about heartworm disease.

The event, sponsored by the American Heartworm Society, will take place Sept. 8 to 11, 2019, at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in New Orleans.

Do your heartworm protocols need an update?

Whether you practice in Alabama, Arizona, California or Connecticut, chances are you have a protocol in place for routine heartworm screening and prevention as well as a plan to treat heartworm-positive dogs. But the American Heartworm Society—which continually monitors the latest studies—has recently updated guidelines. Check to see if you’re up-to-date on ...

 

Risk Management Approaches to Heartworm Disease

The Heartworm Hotline column is presented in partnership between Today’s Veterinary Practice and the American Heartworm Society (heartwormsociety.org). The goal of the column is to communicate practical and timely information on prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of heartworm disease, as well as highlight current topics related to heartworm research and findings in veterinary medicine.

 

 

Counter cost concerns with heartworm treatment

The recently updated American Heartworm Society (AHS) canine heartworm guidelines emphasize the advantages of the protocol over the non-arsenical treatment protocols that have been studied in the U.S. and Europe. While these protocols are needed for dogs that aren’t candidates for melarsomine treatment, the hope is that most heartworm-positive dogs can undergo the AHS treatment regimen, which is designed to eliminate the highest percentage of adult worms while minimizing treatment complications.

 

 

Local Veterinarian Explains Rise in Heartworm Cases

SPRINGFIELD, MA (WGGB/WSHM) -- Heartworm is a potentially fatal disease for pets and can be contracted really anywhere in the world.

This year, veterinarians are seeing a spike in the disease. even in the Pioneer Valley.

 

 

Can I Adopt a Heartworm-Positive Dog?

(StatePoint) Every year, an estimated 3.3 million dogs enter U.S. animal shelters, with roughly half that number subsequently adopted by pet owners. These include shelter dogs with special medical needs that can make them harder to place. Dogs with heartworm infection are a common example.

 

2018 Canine Heartworm Guidelines

New priorities include clarifying testing recommendations and avoiding shortcuts during treatment.

The American Heartworm Society (AHS) has updated its canine heartworm guidelines to focus on reducing heartworm transmission, clarifying testing recommendations and avoiding shortcuts in treatment, according to an association release. The guidelines, which are updated by the society as needed based on assessment of heartworm research, also address heartworm biology and epidemiology, the association says.

 

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