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In the News

The American Heartworm Society is the leading resource on heartworm disease, and our mission is to lead the veterinary profession and the public in the understanding of this serious disease. Every year, hundreds of stories are written on the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of heartworm, as well as on the plight of affected pets. These stories are an important way of reaching both veterinary professionals and pet owners with information they need to know about heartworm disease.

The American Heartworm Society is led by a board of directors comprised of veterinarians and specialists in the fields of veterinary parasitology and internalmedicine. As leaders in the fight against heartworm disease, they are available as resources and authors of related stories.

Members of the media are encouraged to contact the American Heartworm Society for information, visuals and interviews about heartworm disease. Please contact Sue O’Brien at Obriensuek@gmail.com or call 319-231-6129. All other inquiries, please email: info@heartwormsociety.org.

 


 

News & Alerts

Mosquitoes: Everything You Need to Know to Stay Safe This Summer

Let’s start with the good news: Not all mosquitoes bite. “Female mosquitos need certain proteins found in blood to grow their eggs,” says Joseph Conlon, technical advisor, American Mosquito Control Association. Since males don’t produce eggs, they don’t bite.

 

Zika and More: 5 Diseases Spread by Mosquitoes

Here’s a brief look at the diseases that some types of mosquitos can spread in some parts of the world.

ZIKA

Who is affected Specific numbers are hard to come by, but cases have been reported in more than 36 countries in South America, Mexico, the Pacific Islands and the Caribbean since last spring. As of mid-May, 544 people living in the U.S. have acquired Zika by traveling to an affected area.

 

Alert! Heartworm Disease Increasing in Dogs and Cats in LA ... Wildlife and Humans Also at Risk

ANIMAL WATCH-Heartworm disease is a serious infection that results in severe lung disease, heart failure, other organ damage, and death in pets--mainly dogs--but also cats, coyotes, ferrets, wolves, sea lions, seals and other animals. And, occasionally it infects humans. The worms mature into adults, mate, and produce offspring while living inside the heart, lungs, and associated blood vessels of an infected animal.

 

Heartworm prevention: The questionable zero mosquito factor

Even areas with fewer mosquitos can be hotbeds of heartworm infection.

Q. We don’t see a lot of mosquitoes in my practice area. Is it really necessary to push prevention?
A. Veterinarians often refer to their locales as being “endemic” or “nonendemic” for heartworm. For those in many of the Western and Mountain states, the assumption is that if heartworm historically hasn’t been a problem in the region, there’s no reason to recommend yearly testing or heartworm prevention now. I moved to Phoenix—which is in a supposedly nonendemic region less than 18 months ago. During that time, I’ve performed several surgeries for heartworm caval syndrome on dogs that had never left the Phoenix area.

AHS Heartworm Hotline Coming to You from the American Heartworm Society

While heartworm education is a year-round focus of the American Heartworm Society (AHS), many veterinary practices put extra emphasis on heartworm prevention and education in the spring, especially since April is National Heartworm Awareness Month. Therefore, it’s a good time to consider the many resources available to veterinary practices from the AHS.

Heartworm prevention: "Oops, I missed a dose!"

It happens. It happens a lot. Here are your best practices when a lapse in heartworm preventive delivery occurs.

Dog in a box: Battle boredom with comfortable quiet time

While a heartworm diagnosis is tough news for dog owners, dogs can be safely and successfully treated. The American Heartworm Society’s 2014 Current Canine Guidelines for the Prevention, Diagnosis, and Management of Heartworm (Dirfilaria immitis) Infection in Dogs treatment protocol calls for, in most dogs, preadulticide treatment with a heartworm preventive (macrocyclic lactones) and doxycycline, as well as three injections of melarsomine to kill the adult worms that threaten the infected dog’s life and long-term health.

Heartworm Testing: What Every Dog Owner Needs to Know

(StatePoint) Your dog is your best friend, and you take good care of him, making sure he gets quality food andexercise, immunizations and heartworm medication. Why,then, does your veterinarian also insist on a yearly heartworm test?

Heartworm prevention: The reminder quagmire

Forgetting that monthly preventive—it's so easy to do, even for veterinarians and their own pets (you know you've forgotten a time or two!). Here's why and how to not let clients skip a dose again.

Feline Heartworm Disease

Historically, heartworm disease has been overlooked in cats, yet it has provoved to be serious and potentially fatal. Because there is no approved treatment for heartworm infection in cats as there is in dogs, prevention of infection is the best protection. 

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RT @VipPetCare: It is a common myth that the cold, winter months mean your pets are out of harm’s way from heartworm disease, fleas, and ti…

by Heartworm Society