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In the News

The American Heartworm Society is the leading resource on heartworm disease, and our mission is to lead the veterinary profession and the public in the understanding of this serious disease. Every year, hundreds of stories are written on the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of heartworm, as well as on the plight of affected pets. These stories are an important way of reaching both veterinary professionals and pet owners with information they need to know about heartworm disease.

The American Heartworm Society is led by a board of directors comprised of veterinarians and specialists in the fields of veterinary parasitology and internalmedicine. As leaders in the fight against heartworm disease, they are available as resources and authors of related stories.

Members of the media are encouraged to contact the American Heartworm Society for information, visuals and interviews about heartworm disease. Please contact Sue O’Brien at Obriensuek@gmail.com or call 319-231-6129.

 


 

News & Alerts

AHS Heartworm Hotline Heartworm Education: It Takes a Team

Heartworm disease is one of the most important diseases threatening companion animals. According to the American Heartworm Society (AHS), disease caused by Dirofilaria immitis has been diagnosed in all 50 states, and, as most veterinarians and veterinary technicians are aware, it can affect both dogs and cats. Veterinary professionals have a wealth of effective, Food and Drug Administration–approved products, including oral, topical, and injectable formulations, that make heartworm disease preventable. One goal of veterinarians and technicians should be to ensure that every pet is protected from heartworm disease for 12 months each year. The key to realizing this goal is effective client education.

Heartworm-Associated Respiratory Disease in Client-Owned Cats

Feline heartworm disease is diagnosed less frequently than its canine counterpart. Several factors likely contribute to this discrepancy, including the inherent resistance of cats to heart worm infection, the limitations of diagnostic testing for cats, and the nonspecific (and frequently absent) clinical signs associated with feline heartworm disease.

AHS Announces Findings of New Heartworm Incidence Survey

Survey of U.S. veterinarians uncovers per-practice increase in heartworm-positive cases

Wilmingon, DE  (April 17, 2017)—While the hotbeds of heartworm disease haven’t changed dramatically in the past three years, the incidence numbers reported by participants in the 2016 American Heartworm Society (AHS) Incidence Survey indicate that the average number of positive cases per veterinary clinic has been inching upwards. The AHS announced its latest survey data, along with unveiling a new heartworm incidence map based on data from veterinary practices and shelters across the country.

New Slideshow on Mosquitoes for Social Media Use

The American Heartworm Society is proud to present  a new slideshow for use on our members' social media pages. This will be the first of several new tools AHS members can leverage now and during heartworm awareness month. Stay tuned for more!

4 Simple Rules to Keep Your Pet Healthy All Year Long (Martha Stewart Living)

One small — but crucial — tip has to do with heartworm medicine.

It's only natural to stop and take stock of your own health at the start of the new year. Here's why — and how — to do the same for your pets. There's certainly no right or wrong time to reassess the care your pet needs to stay heathy and happy. But the beginning of the year — after the hustle and bustle of the holidays, when you're making resolutions to stick to good habits — is an opportune time to give your pet's well-being the attention it needs, too. We've put together a list of the main tasks to keep in mind.

 

The Back Page: Veterinary Viewpoints The American Heartworm Society Looks Toward the Future An Interview with Dr. Christopher Rehm

Christopher J. Rehm, Sr, DVM, is the incoming president of the American Heartworm Society (AHS). Dr. Rehm graduated from Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine in 1982 and started Rehm Animal Clinic a year later in Mobile, Alabama. The clinic has grown into four AAHA-certified hospitals in two Alabama counties, employing 13 veterinarians and more than 70 support staff. With a clinic slogan of Caring for pets and people since 1983, Rehm Animal Clinic (rehmclinics.com) has won numerous Best Clinic and readers’ choice awards from local newspapers. In addition to practicing veterinary medicine, Dr. Rehm has written a syndicated pet column and hosted live public service spots and serves as a speaker at veterinary meetings.

Complexity of Heartworm Prevention, Diagnosis and Treatment Detailed at 15th Triennial Heartworm Symposium

American Heartworm Society also announces new officers, board members

NEW ORLEANS (September 22, 2016) — Changes in climate, heartworm vectors, diagnostic challenges, prevention practices and treatment protocols all were cited during during the 2016 American Heartworm Society (AHS) Triennial Symposium as reasons why the persistence of heartworm disease continues to confound veterinarians, researchers and pharmaceutical companies.

Heartworm disease is a silent killer, veterinarian says

SAN ANTONIO - Veterinarians call it a silent killer and in San Antonio the chances of a pet being infected with heartworms is higher than most places around the country.

"Probably about 90 percent of our stray dogs in San Antonio are probably infected with heartworms," veterinary technician Crystal Tarr said.

 

Reasons for how heartworm meds are dispensed

Dr. Johns,

My poodle is on Trifexis. What is the logic behind requiring a blood test once a year before selling me this med?

I can buy a six months supply after the test and go back in six months and get six more months but after that they require another blood test to be sure that he does not have heart worms!

Twitter: @AHS_Think12